Image credit: iStock/djedzura Image credit: iStock/djedzura

The debate over the regulation of the porn industry in California has been heating up. People are calling for condom use to be compulsory in the adult film industry to protect actors against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

One big supporter of the movement, which voters will get their say on in November, is former porn actor Cameron Adams. Ms Adams was part of the industry for just three months and filmed only 11 scenes, however, she still managed to contract HIV. She claims that she caught the incurable disease from a partner on set.

"I asked for a condom and I was refused. I would have been fired if I didn't do the scene", she said of the day she believes she contracted HIV.

She is one of many former adult entertainment actors now campaigning for stricter regulations in order to offer better levels of protectors for those who work in the industry. A number of actors have now left the industry because they were scared for their health, including Rachel Bernard.

Ms Bernard said: "Their thought process is money over humanity. They're people in there who have contracted things that they can die from, and they don't care."

While the campaign is hopeful that the changes will be voted in, there are some who are worried that if California approves the new regulations, many companies within the industry will just move to Nevada.

Only California and Nevada allow pornography to be made, so the industry would not have many choices. Similar changes could also be made to Nevada's regulations in the future, which would leave companies with no choice but to comply.

Currently, the porn industry in the US is worth over $10 billion (£6.9 billion), which would likely not be affected by all actors wearing condoms when filming sex scenes.

While actors can sue production companies for not being able to choose whether a condom is used in their scenes, this would mean that their real names and addresses would be released in the court documents. As many actors receive harassment, they are understandably concerned about this happening and so do not take companies to court.

If the regulations are voted in, producers will need to provide condoms, testing and certain vaccinations. The changes would come into effect at the start of 2018.